Tag Archives: ecommerce

Another Christmas has passed, and many around the world went through a short period of stress over the perfect gifts they wanted to buy for their loved ones. In the near past, e-commerce seemed like a perfect solution to gift shopping because it looked like eliminating the stress of going to a store and physically picking out a gift for a family member, amidst large crowds wanting to do just the same.

Because shopping has evolved on the internet, most of the Christmas chores are now being done online, but it seems even then people are still very stressed out over buying the perfect gift while it can only take a few clicks and item names being types in search bars. What’s going on then?

 

Desperate clicking

It’s not necessarily guaranteed you will find the items you want online if not available in a store. Even with websites like Amazon offering so much, people sometimes find themselves frustrated not finding gifts online and they become aggressive and impatient with their clicking/browsing. This behaviour takes place just as much when a website is taking time to load, due to a heavy-trafficked server or slow wifi at home.

Meanwhile, analytics at the retailers‘ offices are showing company bosses that consumers are desperate to find what they want with little time left before Christmas eve. This gives them a chance to get better for the following year.

Confused navigation

Through its analysis of data, an analytics company identified a series of different attitudes based on mouse movements and visitor behaviour patterns. Of these mindsets, ‘disorientation’ proved one of the most troublesome, with many shoppers appearing confused and erratic in their movements across a page or ecommerce site.

This ‘disoriented’ mindset is a key sign that Christmas shoppers have lost their sense of direction and are thinking of abandoning a site. Could this be due to the ‘festive fatigue‘ that cripples many at the end of the calendar year, because work deadlines get overwhelming before the holidays? According to research, average conversion rates are as much as 40% lower for consumers with a predominantly disoriented mindset.

If a retailer’s analytics highlight that numerous customers are suffering from disoriented behaviours, it’s likely that a site’s navigation is not providing a clear enough path from browsing to checkout. This can hinder customer loyalty, result in ‘shopping cart’ abandonment and ultimately cost a company valuable Christmas sales.

Understanding the consumer

Where as those with a disoriented mindset don’t know where they are going on a website, exploring visitors simply don’t know what they want. Instead of navigating to the product or page they want – or taking the time to actively compare products and make a decision – ‘explorers’ simply wander around the site as they would when tiredly shopping in a high street store. These visitors are keen to make a purchase and can be a great source of sales, but only if a retailer’s website is capable of converting them.

Around Christmas, online retailers should expect to see a spike in traffic from those with an exploring mindset, as customers start to browse for possible presents and psychologically window shop for ideas. If retailers are to make the most of these visitors, they must tailor their content to bring the calls to action to the forefront of the site, simplifying the buyer journey. Offers and deals are also a great way to convert these ‘explorers’ from window shoppers to genuine customers.

With Christmas now over for another 12 months, should retailers spend more time in the next year understanding ‘festive fatigue’? Shoppers are partly at fault in all this for leaving gift purchases so late, but this behaviour will never change.

We can only hope retailers begin by looking for solutions to help make next Christmas shopping experiences that little bit easier and stress-free. To appeal to this mindset, online retailers must reclaim the notion that shopping online is the easy alternative to going in store. By using a combination of customer data and appealing design, retailers can make Christmas shopping great again and minimise the potential for festive fatigue.

 

How was YOUR Christmas shopping this year? Will you try starting your shopping earlier next year?

Every year is a little crazy on social, and 2017 has been no different for Facebook. From now up until Christmas, we will try to bring predictions as to what to expect in 2018 for other platforms, given what we have seen this year, and even now.

As communication technology advances and becomes more complicated, augmented reality is making strides forward, and Facebook being at the front of the race. As Mark Zuckerberg even stated on his personal page not long ago, his company is spending plenty of its time on developing this technology further, because it could be at the forefront of our society by 2020 (see Oculus). As we are seeing now, video is the most popular content form and we are evolving from it. While text and photo content is still very prominent, how relevant will it be in the future?

Now, we are talking about seeing a cartoon version of your friends and even family by just wearing a headset! At the rate virtual reality is developing, we soon won’t even need to bother being physically around them.

We have discussed messenger’s evolution and use in a recent post on our Facebook page. It has integrated with PayPal, allowing transactions and payments to be made through a conversation and a couple of clicks. Facebook is trying to turn Messenger into an e-commerce bot (because new trends), but it is not yet a very popular decision with most of its users, because we simple want to use Messenger to… speak to our friends!

In addition to “e-commerce”, paid ads are becoming more common and necessary for businesses to promote themselves, and several features are being added for all types of transactions facilitators to take place. Businesses will be able to focus a new kind of effort on Facebook as a marketplace rather than just a social media platform to advertise in.

This will not only apply to Europe and North America. Facebook intends to make all these features available worldwide, and will want to expand and innovate in ways that we never thought would be possible five years ago.

 

 

 

2017 has been showing us that social media is mainly all about major news, animal and baby photos, as well as celebrity gossip. Social media also helps businesses grow online through branding and engagement with the many people that use social. However, this blog will focus on the business side of things, e-commerce.

E-commerce businesses are so focused on what they do that they forget the need to engage with their community through social. Especially in a time where organic reach is declining and competition is fierce, ignoring active behaviour on social media can be detrimental to sales.

1. Why does social media even matter?

As a business owner, it’s easy to be completely distracted by all the other responsibilities that are associated with e-commerce, such as sales, inventory, finances, orders, customer service, and the rest.

According to the Pew Research Center report on mobile and social media usage:

– 72% of online adults are Facebook users, amounting to 62% of all American adults.

– 31% of online adults use Pinterest (up from 15% in 2012), and 28% use Instagram (up from 13% in 2012).

– 59% of Instagram users are on the platform daily, including 35% who visit several times a day. This 59% figure reflects a 10-point increase from September 2014 when 49% of Instagram users reported visiting the site on a daily basis.

– 70% of Facebook users log on daily, including 43% who do so several times a day.

Social media will likely never go away, even if it fades a tiny bit. It is the era we live in, whether in a personal or business capacity. The more people gain access to internet and a smartphone, the more accounts are going to get opened. However, the networks are making advertising on their sites slightly more complicated, but that’s for another time.

Business owners are making a mistake by not investing on social media – missed opportunities with many potential customers, especially with a very good product or service.

2. Platform choosing

Being an e-commerce business owner means you may not be very familiar with using social media for business purposes. The problem that these businesses have is jump on every platform to try and develop a presence in. It is not necessarily a good idea!

Unless you have a team managing social media presence, being consistent alone, on all platforms, is going to be very difficult. Pick your networks wisely so that you save time and dedicate your effort for a couple of platforms only. Your customers will also only be using a couple of platforms, so make sure you post content where they can see it.

At the end of the day, you just want to make sure you reach current and potential customers, who will also play their part in helping your business grow.

3. Building the presence

Once you have started setting up your business accounts on social, you need to figure out how to build the presence – this is done through the content, both written and visual, as well as the brand voice. If you have a team managing the pages, make sure you have set policies on what you’d want, otherwise giving an individual too much power can take you in a direction different to the one you desire.

The first weeks of starting social media accounts will keep you busy, so get the most out of it while you’re building a community.

4. Content type

When a new business begins sharing content on social media, they need to be aware of what they are trying to achieve with each message. We have mentioned in previous blogs that making the content all about your products and services will push people away and not get you the clients you need.

The objective with social media is to bring value to the followers through education and entertainment. This does not mean you should not promote the business itself – it should be minimal. The content is meant to be more about the public than about you.

5. Community management

This is becoming the most important part of social media. The best thing any kind of business can do is engage with the public consistently. It shows a human side to the brand and people will appreciate it more. Magic won’t happen overnight, but as long as you are consistently good, your efforts will be rewarded eventually! Do not get discouraged.

 

6. Third-party tools

These help make social media management easier, but are not necessary. They are useful to track metrics for the website as well as social media insights, as well as scheduling posts in advance.

“If you want to stay in the game, you have to participate.

If you want to win the game, you have to dominate.”