Category Archives: Social Media

Every year is a little crazy on social, and 2017 has been no different for Facebook. From now up until Christmas, we will try to bring predictions as to what to expect in 2018 for other platforms, given what we have seen this year, and even now.

As communication technology advances and becomes more complicated, augmented reality is making strides forward, and Facebook being at the front of the race. As Mark Zuckerberg even stated on his personal page not long ago, his company is spending plenty of its time on developing this technology further, because it could be at the forefront of our society by 2020 (see Oculus). As we are seeing now, video is the most popular content form and we are evolving from it. While text and photo content is still very prominent, how relevant will it be in the future?

Now, we are talking about seeing a cartoon version of your friends and even family by just wearing a headset! At the rate virtual reality is developing, we soon won’t even need to bother being physically around them.

We have discussed messenger’s evolution and use in a recent post on our Facebook page. It has integrated with PayPal, allowing transactions and payments to be made through a conversation and a couple of clicks. Facebook is trying to turn Messenger into an e-commerce bot (because new trends), but it is not yet a very popular decision with most of its users, because we simple want to use Messenger to… speak to our friends!

In addition to “e-commerce”, paid ads are becoming more common and necessary for businesses to promote themselves, and several features are being added for all types of transactions facilitators to take place. Businesses will be able to focus a new kind of effort on Facebook as a marketplace rather than just a social media platform to advertise in.

This will not only apply to Europe and North America. Facebook intends to make all these features available worldwide, and will want to expand and innovate in ways that we never thought would be possible five years ago.

 

 

 

So, Twitter… another interesting change recently, which is slowly hitting all the millions of accounts globally – we can now tweet in double the characters we have been used to for so long. Even though many have not appreciated this update, we need to give it the benefit of the doubt and convey even more information in one go. Twitter is important for communications in all areas that surround us on a daily basis, and people who make a living out of using Twitter can really benefit from this. But as we know, very well, Twitter is not all serious matters – it can be used in many light hearted ways!

Getting an extra 140 characters means that in a link sharing world, we can now post more than one in a tweet – it saves a bit of time publishing one tweet per link and can be good for brand’s promotional agendas. Journalists covering major news can present information in more detail, and use less thread space.

In bilingual countries, two separate tweets for two languages can also be time consuming, so why not 2-in-1? Brands that are based in Eastern Canada can now tweet in english and french within the same composition!

On a less serious note, people who use Twitter for a laugh can write their jokes using breaks and annoy their followers in a light hearted manner. Oh, and emojis! They are used so often these days and there’s also more space for them now. It’s useful for brands trying to get creative or for a human being to properly express themselves!

Want to tweet song lyrics in longer form? Now you can! Artists and also their followers can express themselves using their songs in a more meaningful way.

How do you plan on using Twitter with 280 characters? 😀 Let’s hope we’ll be thanking Jack Dorsey soon.

As we have mentioned many times before in previous blogs, social media is important and an expected activity by almost every brand in the market. The biggest problem here is managing the brands on all the platforms they are present in, and where to dedicate the most time to.

Social media is the modern communication channel and also drives revenue when used really well.

When we look at the retail industry, which is changing drastically, social media still plays a big role, especially when your friends are involved with reviews of merchandise they have bought at the store. Even then, with e-commerce emerging, brands are using social to encourage customers to purchase online. We’ll get to this in a minute.

It seems that websites have been making an important comeback lately, especially that they can now be optimized for mobile, and brands should not forget to include links to social as well as testimonials on social on their website. If businesses see many positive tweets or Instagram posts about their brand, they’ll make sure to show it on their website as a means of saying “Hey, we’re not the only ones who think our products are good – they do too!” That then can influence an online purchase. Although influencers are not always trusted, having customers use a specific hashtag to express their thoughts is much more authentic and trusted.

Social media is a powerful engagement tool, for users to communicate with one another and brands to communicate with current and potential customers.

As mentioned in the last blog, paid ads are becoming more expensive and not necessarily reaching more people. Authentic, organic content that is boosted for a couple of dollars can be helpful, but you need to show the public that you are curating that content. The same goes for consumer-generated content.

Previous blogs have discussed how Facebook algorithms have been changing to disable a bit of organic reach from business pages, a change that is not going down well with users but leaves them (and us) with no other choice sometimes. Just as it is another source of revenue for the social giant, many companies active on social have to start investing small amounts of money in order to keep getting the visibility they need, but without the creative wisdom of their marketing staff.

Although platforms other than Facebook offer different form of paid ads and billing options, this blog will explain the options we have and how much they cost. Many of you may have seen them by now, but it is a reminder of what’s out there, especially for new users.

Cost-per-click (CPC) – a billing option in which you pay for an ad placement when the viewer clicks on the ad.

Cost-per-thousand impressions (CPM) – a billing option for every 1,000 impressions of an ad.

Cost-per-view (CPV) – a billing option for every time someone views your ad. Some platforms also consider interactions with an ad as a view (such as clicks on the call-to-action buttons, cards or banners).

Cost per action/conversion (CPA) – a billing option for when someone completes the action you specified when optimizing the ad. Actions can include downloading an app, signing up for an email newsletter or making a purchase directly from the ad.

Cost per like – another billing option for every like obtained through the ad campaign or like given to an ad, photo or page.

The most commonly used options are CPC, CPM and sometimes CPA. They would be the ones most worth investing into as it is easy to track ROI.

What about the bidding? There are generally two options available; automatic and maximum.

Maximum bidding lets you decide how much you’re willing to spend to reach your objectives, while automatic bidding does it all for you according to your budget. Note that other platforms have other forms of bidding.

Next, how do you want to structure your budget, day to day or over an entire campaign? You have an option to choose either. However, there is always a minimum required to spend on a daily basis depending on the platform.

The amount you actually pay is determined by what’s needed for you to beat a competitor and have your ad placed. Each platform will charge you 1 cent higher than your competitor if you have the higher maximum bid. In general, the price you pay for social media ads is smaller than your maximum bid.

You don’t pay for the placement of your ad. You only pay when the user takes the action specified for your campaign (impression, click, like, etc.).

Have any more questions you’d like to ask us for your business? Feel free to reach out!

This week’s blog is set to discuss a new and emerging trend in social media marketing, resulting from the unfortunate change of algorithms with social networks, preventing Facebook pages (especially) from getting the organic reach they want on their posts. Welcome to “growth hacking“!

Growth hacking has become a new concept in the last year or so that businesses are trying to use to ‘cheat’ the system and find new ways to grow their social media accounts to get conversions. Before paid ads and post boosts became common, it was easy to reach all of your following every time you posted something. Now, you’d be lucky to reach half organically. These paid options want to guarantee a bigger reach if you show the money, but we’re unsure how well it really works in terms of ROI.

 

1. Money for Likes

Whether on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, businesses and personal brands are now spending money to look like they have bigger numbers supporting them. However, these new followers and likes are not necessarily genuine and; going through a list of likes can see you being followed by strange looking accounts.

Buying yourself a fake following can immediately destroy your credibility after having spent so much time and effort building it initially, so why be so desperate to hurt your budget for a bigger number? If you are caught doing that, you can also get punished by the main networks.

Data insights are crucial to the strategy a business takes with social, and fake data will ruin all important metrics which will be hard to fix later on. Your business will likely respect you more if you conduct digital affairs in an honest manner. Is cheating morally and financially really worth it?

2. Team Instagram

There is a somewhat witty way to ‘cheat’ on Instagram, without spending money or feeling guilty of looking good. IG’s algorithms work in a way where engagement is key to success. So in this case, groups of people all agree to support each other’s pages by constantly liking and commenting on photos. Team effort can eventually lead to victory.

But here comes the problem. This means only a specific network of people are showing you love, while millions of others probably aren’t aware of what’s going on, or these posts won’t be visible to them, so the reach is again limited, and not great for metrics.

3. Twitter Favourites

Twitter has seen an interesting change lately, where just like Facebook, tweet likes of accounts you don’t even follow appear on your news feed, simply because someone else you follow liked that tweet. Half of newsfeeds are filled up with that, and the best tweets can get additional likes and retweets from many other accounts that don’t follow them. Twitter’s algorithms fortunately still favour organic reach, which is a huge plus for everyone involved and should make the most of it while this system is still around.

The only downside to this is ultimately the financial side, as it may not count for much at the end if businesses aren’t selling products/services at the end of it.

Play by the rules of the game, even if they don’t necessarily appeal to you. Cheat and you’re in trouble if you get caught!

Modern day content marketing means businesses and personal brands need to publish as much quality content as possible to stand out, and that generally leads to an overload of content on social media and the internet. It is much harder to get noticed unless quality meets quantity.

So what are some ways for you to make your articles go viral?

1) An intriguing title

Let’s face it – human beings do not have much patience with content these days, so you’d be silly to think every article gets clicked on. Want to capture attention? The title needs to be very captivating, and about a subject the user can relate to, in order to get your click.

 

2) Visuals

Graphics are going to become more and more popular. The human eye generally prefers something colorful to look at, and written content alone doesn’t always attract attention, but visuals do! Make it a habit to include them in the featured image and in the article as well.

3) Release

Once the article has been published on your website, make sure it’s also a headline act in all the social media feeds you use. When it comes to Twitter, tweet it out as many times using different hashtags and messages, all relating to the same story. These can be scheduled or done spontaneously.

4) Pay up?

Because of social media’s changing algorithms, businesses have a lot less joy reaching out to all their followers for free. It’s almost necessary to spend money if you want any kind of content to reach in the hundreds if not thousands of users. If you feel your article hasn’t received the traction it deserves, sometimes spending between $5 and $10 to ‘boost’ the post could be key in getting results.

It has been a while since our last blog about LinkedIn. The professional networking site has always been an interesting medium, and has allowed many to connect and communicate with fellow industry members, or whoever they liked, whether or not they knew them personally. L.I. is also often used to share work stories and advertise for roles. So what’s coming next in 2017?

More pictures! Just like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, LinkedIn will now allow users to post multiple photos per post. This can be an advantage as it allows employees and business pages to better showcase events or team/office photos. Will businesses change the way they share visual content?

Videos! Users are expecting to be able to record videos from mobile devices straight onto a LinkedIn post. However, this should NOT be treated like a Facebook video or IG story. We are sure company policies will be strict in the way videos are filmed at the office or events – “no crazy video selfies”.

 

 

Offsite. When you want to read an article outside LinkedIn, but are being ask to logon back to the app to view the article, it’s irritating! It appears L.I. will take that restriction away and be open to its users viewing specific articles elsewhere.

Shared proofreading. Just like Google docs, L.I. will allow content teams on business pages to edit articles written on behalf of their business.

Monitoring engagement. If you don’t want people commenting on your article, LinkedIn allows you to disable comments. It’s a good way to avoid any kind of negativity but sadly, compliments or any kind of positive conversation will not be permitted.

Besides video and visuals, writing is still a fundamental aspect of online marketing, and given the competitive nature of social media and SEO for organic reach, the quality of writing only needs to get better for everyone involved in this industry. What are some of the ways the copywriting competition can be taken up a notch?

1. As they say, you cannot please everyone! Your page has a following and a target market, so it is best to consistently please the audience that already appreciates you, and tailor your content to elicit a reaction only from them. You can please hundreds and thousands, but everybody? It’s hard!

2. We understand you want to be creative and witty with your words, but often, you have to pretend a 10 year old is reading this and they need to understand it from the first glance. Keep it simple, concise, and to the point. Trying too hard to be cool will only backfire.

3. We are going through a phase where disagreements on anything are more common than not. If you’re going to be ‘politically incorrect’, make sure there is evidence to back up your claim. You don’t want to lose your audience over something controversial.

4. In any kind of writing, the first and last paragraphs are the ones that will stick the most with your readers, so make sure they are the best parts of the copy. In many cases, a ‘right hook‘ will be thrown to boost sales, and you’d want a good conversion rate.

5. Editing is more important than writing. The first draft will never be usually the published version. If you are struggling with content, write until you’re out of ideas, and seek help from your team in the process. The editing part becomes more important because you are just polishing the initial ideas into something more tangible. You’ll find yourself removing more words than you know, but nothing to feel bad about.

6. To complement the above point, everyone may have a different way of editing their articles, and as they also say, ‘You do you’.

 

7. And to complement #5 and #6, double and triple check everything you have written. It’s better to publish late because of editing time than publish early with some small but horrible mistakes. Once it’s online, you can sometimes never take it back. Save yourself some blushes and proofread as much as you need to!

Please feel free to contact us if you have any more questions on copywriting!

This week, we carry on discussing successful social media campaigns conducted by brands around the world and the results they gained. We find this fascinating and want to share the stories in the simplest way possible!

5. Play Melbourne

A tourism agency in Melbourne, Australia, wanted foreigners to see the authentic side of their city. The unique part of their campaign was their dependence on Periscope for its entirety. We have often discussed how live videos is a great way to engage your audience in real time, and Visit Victoria did a brilliant job with it.

Result; over 40 live broadcasts, more than 28,000 views!

6. Hungry Snickers

Another example of being creative around restrictions. Because Facebook auto-plays videos without sound, Snickers used this ‘problem’ to stun viewers in line with their campaign slogan. They created music videos that look like normal music videos when they are played without sound, and had a call-to-action to tap to hear what hunger sounds like.

When people tapped on the video and the sound is turned on, funny music played that one wouldn’t expect from the looks of the video. For example, one of their videos featured a rock band singing The Wheels on the Bus!

Result; over 16 million views!

7. Starbucks RedCup

Co-creation is the most interactive form of marketing, but isn’t used enough by big brands in their campaigns. Allowing the audience to be a part of the marketing itself can create overwhelming engagement.

Every festive period, Starbucks gives the chance to its followers to design and submit their own #RedCup on Instagram, and hands out prizes to the best ones.

8. Krylon & Pinterest

The spray paint company has a strong Pinterest presence and wanted to do something unique. The social media network recently added a feature that allows users to shop! Krylon employees filmed themselves buying old items at a yard sale, spray painting and then reselling said items for double their original price; on Pinterest!

Result; a massive increase in traffic to Krylon’s Pinterest page and millions of dollars in earned media.

 

9. Know your lemons

A woman who sadly lost her grandmother to breast cancer decided to put her design skills to use by illustrating signs of breast cancer using lemons. A simple graphic that went viral because many understood them.

Result; 166 million views in one month alone.

10. ADT Monitoring

A security company made the most out of a young boy’s request due his fear of ghosts by asking customer service to monitor his room one night. The full ordeal was recorded and then turned into an animated video, which was then posted on National Ghost Hunting Day.

It’s always a good idea to post company material at the same time as national/international events that are relevant. It’s likely to create plenty of positive engagement.

Result; 130,000 impressions and 1,000 clicks to ADT’s website.

Managing social media pages and running social media campaigns are not quite the same thing. What we do as an agency is the former, and upon client request we would run a campaign that would last a short while. Campaigns that big brands have undertaken can teach everyone, including us, how to take it to the next level. By writing this blog, we are also educating ourselves!

Eurostar, with the help of an agency, had created a campaign through Instagram with about 200 images and animated videos. They even created a separate account with the name of the campaign (La Vie on Board), and attempted to dazzle followers with visuals as well as subtly offering special ticket prices to destinations in London and Paris.

Their campaign was successful because they created something so unique within an existing platform. They managed an additional following as well as plenty of engagement.

Music.ly is an emerging platform that is generating plenty of buzz, although it’s not for everyone. If you are into music and make your own videos, hop on to it NOW.

Coca Cola is known for its tasty beverages, but even more for it’s amazing marketing campaigns. Following up on ‘Share the coke’, they had started a new campaign in China, which they then brought into the US. Their campaign was called “Share a Coke and a song”, where they targeted music.ly as the main campaign platform and got some famous artists to collaborate. A contest was hosted which invited their followers to create music videos with the songs on the bottles and share them on Musical.ly.

That, too, went very well! 900,000 new music videos and over 100 million views and a trendy new hashtag, #ShareaCoke . Coca Cola specifically wanted to target teenagers passionate about music, and there was a platform exactly for that!

Are you a Taco fan? If yes, you’ll enjoy this segment of the blog. Taco Bell and an LA Agency partnered up to create…. a taco emoji! This was a Twitter campaign that was based on audience engagement with emojis, and Taco Bell would respond with a GIFs whenever they got a tweet. However, to keep up with demand, TB automated the responses, but the campaign was very successful too.

 

 

What does a brand do when a competitor sponsors an event they want to get their name into? AirBnb had to get creative around its limits around the Oscars, which in a way turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Their hashtag #LiveInTheMovies encouraged followers to suggest what movie they would have liked to be in during that weekend. AirBnb was NOT even allowed to talk about the Oscars.

Things worked out just fine for the big brand and showed that there is always a way to think outside the box when limitations are imposed.

These stories will carry on over the next couple of weeks. If there’s a social media campaign that recently caught your attention, feel free to share it in the comments! We have already learned so much from this! 🙂